Introduction

From Five Manuals To One

Nicholson & Co has vast experience in the building, repair and restoration of pipe organs since its foundation in 1841 by John Nicholson. Our team offers a comprehensive range of organ building services from small home practice organs to large cathedral instruments, and everything in between, particularly organs designed to embrace the contemporary needs and budget of a parish church.

Clients wishing to commission a new instrument – from one stop to one hundred – may place their confidence in a company which will have the answer to their requirements, the vision to share their aspirations. Our Managing Director, Andrew Moyes, is himself an experienced church organist which greatly helps the company to understand the hopes (and sometimes anxieties) of our ecclesiastical clients. Our happy relationship with our clients helps explain why a large number of the many hundreds of organs built by us since 1841 are still maintained by Nicholson.

New mechanical action instruments are much admired by players who prefer the crisp traditional touch of a ‘tracker’ organ and accept the disciplines of layout and stop-list which mechanical action dictates. Those customers desiring a ‘cathedral’ type instrument, with romantic sonorities and higher wind pressures, will probably opt for electro-pneumatic action. Our tracker and electro-pneumatic mechanisms are of the most cleverly-engineered nature, contemporary in design yet traditional in materials. They result in key and stop actions which are fast, silent – and utterly reliable.

Brand-new instruments are not commissioned every day: restoration or the rebuilding of existing organs forms much of our work. A much-altered organ can be rebuilt to a sensible specification with new soundboards and a new wind system, thus guaranteeing ‘as new’ condition and reliability. A worn-out but worthy instrument can be fully overhauled and renovated back to reliable playing condition, or an organ of historical merit can be restored with scrupulous adherence to modern conservation practice.